Friday, August 29, 2014

Is the universe is a hologram?

Experiment tests whether universe is a hologram
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Physicists at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory near Chicago, Illinois, announced this week that the Holometer, a device designed to test whether we live in a giant hologram, has started taking data.

"The theory is that space is made of waves instead of points, that everything is a little jittery, and never sits still," says Craig Hogan at the University of Chicago, who dreamed up the experiment.

The Holometer is designed to measure this "jitter". The surprisingly simple device is operated from a shed in a field near Chicago, and consists of two powerful laser beams that are directed through tubes 40 metres long. The lasers precisely measure the positions of mirrors along their paths at two points in time.

If space-time is smooth and shows no quantum behaviour, then the mirrors should remain perfectly still. But if both lasers measure an identical, small difference in the mirrors' position over time, that could mean the mirrors are being jiggled about by fluctuations in the fabric of space itself.

Hogan cautions that the idea that the universe is a hologram is somewhat misleading because it suggests that our experience is some kind of illusion, a projection like a television screen. If the Holometer finds a fundamental unit of space, it won't mean that our 3D world doesn't exist. Rather it will change the way we understand its basic makeup. And so far, the machine appears to be working.
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(People who deny there is a creator will confuse and deceive people by trying to explain the universe created itself..ie the "big bang" etc.

These people are deceivers who deceive others about creation. Men will continue to deny GOD created the universe.) Story Reports
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How can we see light from distant stars if the universe is less than 10,000 years old?
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How can we see light from distant stars if the universe is less than 10,000 years old?

One of the primary evidences claimed for an old universe – and, by implication, an Earth billions of years old – is that light from the most distant stars can be observed on Earth today. It is argued that at the known speed or velocity of light it will have taken a great deal longer than, say, 6,000 years for it to have traveled from the distant stars to Earth.

There is an inherent assumption in this seemingly rational argument that flies in the face of real science. There are a few but well established laws of physics agreed to by astrophysicists and all other scientists. One of these laws is the Second Law of Thermodynamics. It states that everything in the known universe is slowing down or going to a state of lower energy. Put another way, everything known about the Earth and the universe is running downhill. For example, we know our cars rust and wear out. They do not get better as they age. In contrast, evolution is a theory – NOT a Law – claiming that the velocity of light is and always has been the same. Is the velocity of light really constant, and are all the other related "physical constants" also constant? The answer is no.

The velocity of light was first determined in 1675 when measurements were made based upon the eclipses of Jupiter's moons. Other, more refined methods have been employed since 1874. Between that date and the present, there is a statistically significant but small decrease in velocity. Interestingly, all the other related physical constants are also changing – either increasing or decreasing according to their relationship to the velocity of light.

Furthermore, velocity with respect to time is a hyperbolic function. In the case of light, this means that at Creation the velocity was extremely high and it then began to fall, very rapidly at first. Then, as time progressed, the rate at which the speed of light fell became less rapid. Today, it is almost a constant. The curve – showing the decreasing speed of light – is now almost horizontal. However, the small decrease is very real and still measurable.

From the biblical viewpoint, the light from the most distant stars probably reached the Garden of Eden a few days after creation. In other words, Adam's night sky became progressively brighter until it reached the grandeur seen today on a cloudless night in the dry deserts of Egypt. The night sky still evokes a sense of awe and wonder of the God who created it … just as it did in ancient times.
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Making Sense of Light from Distant Stars
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Making Sense of Light from Distant Stars

"What does Scripture tell us about the distance of galaxies and the time needed for light to travel between galaxies? Light needs millions of years to travel from a galaxy like Andromeda to the Earth, doesn't it?"

Scripture does not directly speak to the issue of light traveling from distant stars and galaxies. Neither does it say anything about the amount of time it takes for the light to reach Earth, but we do have some hints. For example, on Day 4 of Creation Week (Genesis 1:14-19), God calls forth the lights in the firmament. Adam was created on Day 6. He most likely saw many of the stars at that time, which is only two days later. This suggests that the starlight had to travel much faster than we would ordinarily think, assuming a uniform space and an apparent uniform speed of light.

So perhaps space is not uniform. Indeed, both Isaiah 42:5 and Isaiah 45:12 describe the heavens as being "stretched out" by God. If the heavens are stretched out, this is clearly not describing a uniform space but one that is stretched in at least parts of it. If the very fabric of space is stretched in parts, then light would travel much faster through these "stretchy" parts than through the non-stretched parts, such as around the galaxies. A simple analogy would be, for example, a guitar sting. Tightening a string produces a higher-pitched sound when plucked, but it also causes the sound wave to travel faster through the string. Thus, stretched (tighter) space would cause light to travel faster through it.

Einstein's Theory of General Relativity very accurately describes how space is distorted around matter – the heavier the matter, the more distorted space is around it. For example, his theory would predict that a massive object (say, a neutron star) between Earth and a distant light source (a bright star or galaxy, for example) should distort space enough for it to act like a lens. As the distant light source passed behind the massive object, at some point, instead of seeing one light source a person would actually see two – one on either side of the massive object. The distance between the two apparent stars is directly related to the lens effect (space distortion). This is, indeed, what is observed, and the distance between the two apparent stars is in perfect agreement with Einstein’s predictions.

This and other similar experiments prove that space is physically distorted by matter and is not uniform. Using Einstein's General Relativity equations, Mark Amunrud at the August 2013 International Conference on Creation suggested that light from the most distant galaxies (13.8 billion light years away) would reach Earth in just about one week.

So while Scripture doesn’t directly say that light travels much faster between the galaxies to arrive on Earth quickly, it gives us enough clues to piece together the puzzle.
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Good News Post
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Speed of light slowing down after all?

God and the electron


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